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Richard Dallam, FAIA

As a partner and leader of NBBJ’s international healthcare practice, Richard Dallam is redefining hospital design.

An architect keenly attuned to the spectrum of joyful and vulnerable moments encountered within healthcare environments, he has advocated an expanded view of healthcare architecture for the profession that encompasses the design of more effective health delivery processes.

He consistently reaches beyond conventional wisdom—and the traditional realm of the architect—to define new design methodologies that not only advance healthcare architecture but also catalyze positive innovations in the delivery of care. He recently partnered with the Southcentral Foundation in Alaska on a new clinic model. The care model has achieved unprecedented results in improving the health of its enrollees while cutting the costs of treating them, garnering a Malcolm Baldrige award from the United States Commerce Department.

Rich speaks on the topic of “designing health” and is frequently invited to major industry conferences. He has been interviewed by MSN, The Hill and Metropolis magazine on topics as diverse as healthcare, design, innovation, and health reform. Healthcare Design magazine selected him as one of “Twenty Who Are Making a Difference.”


SPEAKING HIGHLIGHTS

Health Insights, Rapid Prototyping: Enhancing the design process for performance, experience and place making, Montreal, October 2012

Washington State University, Designing Health (Keynote Speaker), Spokane, October 2010

Health Insights, The Good Health Comprehensive Model for Healthcare, Atlanta, April 2010

Health Insights, Healthcare Reform-Implications for Healthcare Design and Construction, Boston, October 2009

Virginia Mason Medical Center, Lean by Design, Seattle, November 2007

Health Insights, Rebuilding Healthcare in New Orleans, Seattle, October 2007

The Lean Hospital Productivity by Design Expert Workshop, Lean by Design, London, February 2006